Authors: Andjela Bogdan, Marko Mrazovac, Josip Sertic

Corrrespoding author: Anđela Bogdan, MSc.CE (EYE-HR)

Once it is open to traffic, the Rohtang Tunnel in Himlayas, India will probably be officially included in the Guinness World Records books as the longest tunnel in the world situated at an altitude of more than 3000 m above sea level.

Croatian experts on the top of the world: working experience on Himalayas

No road in the world is harmless. Ideal weather conditions, strict speed limits, and good visibility, can offer just a limited help to drivers. However, some of the roads around the world can certainly not be ranked among the brightest points of transport infrastructure. Moreover, some of them are known as the most dangerous roads in the world. The list is headed by Indian roads, especially those built in the Himalayas. To prevent accidents, Indian authorities have decided to build a tunnel through the Himalayas. The tunnel will be of much help to villages cut off from the rest of the world during wintertime, when most over-ground roads remain inoperable due to heavy snowfalls, landslides and strong winds.



By Anđela Bogdan, MSc.CE  (EYE-HR)

In 2001 Áron Losonczi – back then a 24 year old student – had the striking idea to make concrete blocks look a bit nicer and visually appealing by mixing concrete with optical glass fibers, and the result was Light Transmitting Concrete. In the following two years he had developed a manufacturing technology supported by engineers from the Budapest University of Technology to transform his prototype into a marketable product that can be produced in bigger quantities. In 2003 his invention – LiTraCon– was presented at several exhibitions and given the huge public interest it was obvious that Áron’s solution will be sought after. Driven by the excellent feedback from industry experts he has patented the product and in 2004 founded his company in Csongrád, Hungary to manufacture and market LiTraCon solutions and products worldwide.



By Anđela Bogdan, MSc.CE (EYE-HR)

Perhaps the most famous name in green architecture, architect Stefano Boeri has set his sights on a new market: Asia. The renowned designer of Milan’s Bosco Verticale will bring a similar project to the eastern Chinese city of Nanjing.

Given growing concerns over air quality in China, Boeri’s creation serves a particularly practical purpose in Nanjing’s densely populated Pukou district. The idea is simple: The two greenery-laden towers absorb ambient carbon dioxide while simultaneously introducing oxygen into the surrounding air. Preliminary estimates suggest that the building will be able to absorb some 25 tons of CO2 each year and generate 60 kilograms of oxygen per day. This is all thanks to the 1,100 trees and 2,500 hanging plants affixed to each tower’s façade.