September 13, 2018 Paula Weidinger0

By Božo Cicvarić, mag. ing. traff. (EYE-HR)

Source: www.youtube.com/watch?v=3E12uju1vgQ (YouTube printscreen)

“Space is one of the places in which origami plays a significant role. Certain items need to be small in order fit into rockets, and then, when they reach their destination in space, they need to be big. When you have those two needs, origami is the right solution for the transition between those two states.” – Robert J. Lang

Science of Origami

Most of us have more or less encountered origami when we were children. Origami is a craft of making a model by folding a paper – no cutting, no gluing.

Today, origami is more than just a crane and a childhood play. There are many types of origami that continually inspire engineers from all fields and professions: biologists, mathematicians, scientists, and – lately – astronauts.



August 4, 2018 Paula Weidinger0

By Nadia Lemssouguer (FI)

No matter where we come from, no matter who we represent, a discussion about the idea was there. A discussion about the point of view, about the practices in the different engineering associations in Europe. This is true diversity. This is Europe.

The topic of the conference held in Sofia from 18 to 20 May was “sustainable engineering”. Not only the technical aspects of sustainable development were discussed, but also various other topics such as diversity and communication!

I, Nadia Lemssouguer, represent(ed) l’Association Femmes Ingénieurs – the French Women Engineers Association.

In the beginning, we had an opening speech given by the Bulgarian Minister of Education, a warm and meaningful speech. A Bulgarian Professor also enlightened us by his speech about the development of sustainable engineering in Europe.

For a french version of this article, see below.

 



Authors: Andjela Bogdan, Marko Mrazovac, Josip Sertic

Corrrespoding author: Anđela Bogdan, MSc.CE (EYE-HR)

Once it is open to traffic, the Rohtang Tunnel in Himlayas, India will probably be officially included in the Guinness World Records books as the longest tunnel in the world situated at an altitude of more than 3000 m above sea level.

Croatian experts on the top of the world: working experience on Himalayas

No road in the world is harmless. Ideal weather conditions, strict speed limits, and good visibility, can offer just a limited help to drivers. However, some of the roads around the world can certainly not be ranked among the brightest points of transport infrastructure. Moreover, some of them are known as the most dangerous roads in the world. The list is headed by Indian roads, especially those built in the Himalayas. To prevent accidents, Indian authorities have decided to build a tunnel through the Himalayas. The tunnel will be of much help to villages cut off from the rest of the world during wintertime, when most over-ground roads remain inoperable due to heavy snowfalls, landslides and strong winds.



By Anđela Bogdan, MSc.CE  (EYE-HR)

In 2001 Áron Losonczi – back then a 24 year old student – had the striking idea to make concrete blocks look a bit nicer and visually appealing by mixing concrete with optical glass fibers, and the result was Light Transmitting Concrete. In the following two years he had developed a manufacturing technology supported by engineers from the Budapest University of Technology to transform his prototype into a marketable product that can be produced in bigger quantities. In 2003 his invention – LiTraCon– was presented at several exhibitions and given the huge public interest it was obvious that Áron’s solution will be sought after. Driven by the excellent feedback from industry experts he has patented the product and in 2004 founded his company in Csongrád, Hungary to manufacture and market LiTraCon solutions and products worldwide.



By Anđela Bogdan, MSc.CE (EYE-HR)

Perhaps the most famous name in green architecture, architect Stefano Boeri has set his sights on a new market: Asia. The renowned designer of Milan’s Bosco Verticale will bring a similar project to the eastern Chinese city of Nanjing.

Given growing concerns over air quality in China, Boeri’s creation serves a particularly practical purpose in Nanjing’s densely populated Pukou district. The idea is simple: The two greenery-laden towers absorb ambient carbon dioxide while simultaneously introducing oxygen into the surrounding air. Preliminary estimates suggest that the building will be able to absorb some 25 tons of CO2 each year and generate 60 kilograms of oxygen per day. This is all thanks to the 1,100 trees and 2,500 hanging plants affixed to each tower’s façade.



May 3, 2018 Paula Weidinger0

By Orsolya Nagy

Would you like to build international relationship with engineers from foreign countries? Have you ever wondered what kind of research young engineers are involved in in European countries? Would you like to join a foreign spiritual community? Would you like to travel good places where you can enjoy programs that are both technical and cultural at the same time? Would you like to participate in international projects during or after university?

Dear Young Engineers,

The answer to all the above mentioned questions is the European Young Engineers community abbreviated EYE. EYE was founded in 1994 to bring together young engineer organizations, chambers and specialized colleges all around Europe. In this community, engineers can share knowledge. It is great to be a member of EYE because it supports you to be prepared for the rapidly changing European market and to increase international cooperation. Currently, EYE consists of 22 engineering colleges/chambers and more than 150,000 young mixed engineers in the age between 20 and 35 years: civil engineers, supply chain engineers, aircraft engineers, process engineers, IT engineers, and many more. EYE organizes two 3-day conferences each year, which are held each time in another country. The conference is organized jointly by young engineers and national training colleges/national engineering associations in their country, where 80-300 engineers participate.



April 4, 2018 Paula Weidinger0

By Christian Behrens (VDI)

Since I was young I wanted to become an engineer. School and university had been difficult, but the hardest part is done and my perspective to be an engineer is great. I know that I am lucky to be born and raised in Europe and have had the possibility of getting educated in Europe.

When I did finish my Bachelor’s Degree, I wanted to visit Africa and learn more about its people and cultures for a few months. Doing my research I found a newly-founded, small HIV-Project, called WAGEGO, on a small island in Lake Victoria, Kenya. There, the project needed helping hands for organic farm work and social work activities. I decided to join this project, go to Mfangano Island and stay there for two months. I met David Agagwa WAGEGO’s founder, and helped him with the project. What I learned about living on a Kenyan Island, the unique community and the beneficial work of WAGEGO is really noteworthy!



February 27, 2018 Paula Weidinger0

One of the key enablers of Industry 4.0 is the communications technologies that allow users to connect to the many devices that make up cyber-physical systems. These have the catchy name ‘the Internet of Things’ (IoT).

You don’t need to be a Computer Scientists or Network Engineer to understand how IoT will bridge the physical world with the Internet; a systems-wide view will still enable you to talk with confidence about the technologies and societal impact we expect to see emerge over the next few years. We’ve collected some resources that can help you get your head around the core ideas.



September 27, 2016 Paula Weidinger0

From 08 October to 11 October 2015 Lisbon hosted the FEANI Conference under the motto ‘Engineering the Future’. Across the city as well was the First European Young Engineers Forum on ‘Collaborative Engineering – The European way’.

The conference provided a great opportunity to bring together students, scientists, educators, managers and leaders of industry from all over Europe. Sharing new best practices, learning from each other and exchanging knowledge was the order of the day for delegates. The conference brought together leaders in society and science, representing the many aspects of the Engineering community.



April 1, 2016 Paula Weidinger0

If you happen to be a young engineer in the VDI, chances are that in early spring, people will start asking you things like: ’Are you gonna be there, on Thursday?‘ or ‘See you on that Thursday!’. ‘That Thursday’ being the Thursday during Hannover trade fair.

But what’s so special about “that Thursday”?

Well, it’s the day of students and young engineers at the VDI booth on the fair grounds and it is a meeting point for friends from all over Germany. People will flock in by bus, train or individually to meet with peers, take part in special events throughout the fair grounds and finally let the day end in a big party at the VDI booth.